Year Estimated Number of GFCI Protected Homes Total
Electrocutions
Consumer Products Electrocution
1968 1,048 481
1969 1,148 495
1970 1,140 565
1971 1,065 531
1972 1,088 484
1973 1,149 585
1974 1,157 521
1975 12,993,400 1,224 562
1976 14,370,600 1,041 433
1977 16,027,700 1,183 510
1978 17,895,200 984 430
1979 19,766,000 1,024 425
1980 21,267,600 1,095 431
1981 22,533,300 1,008 430
1982 23,538,800 979 402
1983 24,929,100 872 370
1984 26,581,300 888 370
1985 28,284,600 810 340
1986 30,041,000 850 350
1987 31,709,800 760 310
1988 33,239,600 710 290
1989 34,662,400 710 300
1990 35,970,400 670 270
1991 37,061,200 630 250
1992 38,218,700 530 200
1993 39,411,400 550 210
1994 40,758,300 560 230
1995 42,070,900 560 230
1996 43,483,800 480 190
1997 44,884,300 490 190
1998 46,358,500 550 200
1999 47,963,400 440 170
2000 49,537,100 400 150
2001 51,107,900 441 180
2002 52,756,300 432 60
2003 54,435,000 377 60
2004 56,276,900 387 60
2005 58,208,300 394 90
2006 60,187,700 390 50
2007 61,590,500 370 60
2008 62,810,200 306 50
2009 63,604,600 305 100
2010 64,256,300 280 50
2011 64,841,200 277 50
2012 65,490,400 251 40
2013 66,254,800 231 40
2014 67,138,600 231 40
2015 68,106,800 202 30
2016 69,166,500 234 40
2017 70,319,400 228 40

GFCI Protected Homes v Electrocutions

Since the first introduction of GFCIs in homes, there has been an:

  • 83% drop in electrocutions
  • 95% drop in electrocutions caused by consumer products.

The Consumer Product Safety Commission estimates that:

  • 47% of current electrocutions could be prevented with proper GFCI protection 
  • 50% of American homes were built before the introduction of GFCIs
  • There are potentially 43 million American homes without GFCI protection

Major GFCI Mandates in the National Electrical Code. 

  • 1971: Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters required for outdoor receptacles
  • 1975: Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters required for bathroom receptacles
  • 1978: Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters required in garage wall receptacles
  • 1987: 
    • Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters on countertop receptacles within 6 ft of kitchen sink
    • Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters required in at least one basement receptacle
  • 1990: Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters required in crawl spaces
  • 1993: Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters required within 6 ft of wet bar sinks
  • 1996: 
    • Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters required in all outdoor receptacles, including balconies 
    • Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters required as all kitchen receptacles serving countertops
  • 1999: Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter required for electric heating cables in all floors
  • 2005: Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter required within 6 ft of laundry & utility sinks
  • 2011: Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter required in receptacles within 6 ft of any sink
  • 2014: 
    • Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter required in receptacles within 6 ft of any bathtub or shower stall 
    • Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter required in receptacles in laundry areas
    • Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter required in receptacles or junction boxes for kitchen dishwashers
  • 2017: Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter Current Requirements

Was your home built before 1976? Have a qualified electrician inspect your electrical system to ensure it is up to code.

The Importance of a Qualified Electrician

Qualified electricians are:

  • Licensed to work in your state
  • Dedicated to continual quality of work based on continuing education
  • Trained on the National Electrical Code – the minimum safety standard for electrical work
  • Qualified electricians have 500-750 days of on the job apprenticeship training and 144 hours of classroom training before they are licensed to work on your home or business